Interstellar Tesseract Paradox Explained

The ending scene of the movie Interstellar has made a name of itself boggling all the viewers’ minds; experts, physicists, scientists, and the ordinary ones. And they’re still perplexed that what does the Tesseract scene means.

Going deep into the physics of the scene, theorists have proposed 1001 theories each. While we cannot give all of them, the most common and most logical one has been chosen and presented in front of you. To fully explain it, we have to look back at the whole movie, so if you haven’t watched it then spoilers alert.

Starts with a “hollywoodistic” storm which is taking over the earth, a secret NASA mission pop-ups to find the last hope of humanity, a planet where we can migrate to save the human race. Inviting former NASA astronaut, who is now a corn farmer Cooper (Matthew McConaughey) to accompany a spatial mission where NASA is sending a group of astronauts to find a new habitable planet for the humans through the recently discovered wormhole (mentioned as Gargantua) near Saturn. So, to join the mission, Cooper now has to leave his family.

While Cooper asks that how NASA is going to search for the ideal planet, they say that someone called they created a wormhole near Saturn which humans can use to migrate through greater distances in space. NASA described “they” as a superintelligent race who has gained knowledge even about the multi-dimensions.

NASA also reveals that they’ve sent thirteen astronauts till now for gathering data whether the nearby planets are capable of sustaining life or not. At their arrival, they’ve placed a beacon, each for referring to their candidate planets. Though NASA cannot communicate with the astronauts directly but can track their beacons, and they found only three active.

Now, Cooper and his team have to find out their condition and collect the ensuing data that NASA can use to know if the planet would be able to sustain life or not. Meanwhile, Cooper and Amelia (Anne Hathaway) took the trek to the third planet where Amelia’s astronaut lover is still giving positive signals. For confirming if NASA is taking any misstep, Cooper sends TARS, the helping robot into the wormhole. Cooper also jumps on the wormhole to ensure that Amelia reaches the planet but ends up inside the Tesseract which was created by “they”.

While in the Tesseract, he gets a simple explanation from TARS, “Somewhere, in their fifth dimension. They saved us… they constructed this three-dimensional space inside their five-dimensional reality to allow you to understand it… You’ve seen that time is represented here as a physical dimension – you even worked out that you can exert a force (referring to an action Cooper just did in the Tesseract, Cooper SMASHES a book from the shelf with all his might) across spacetime.”

While Cooper was trying to communicate to Murph through the Tesseract; TARS says, “Even if you communicate it here, she wouldn’t understand its significance for years… Cooper, they didn’t bring us here to change the past.”

Cooper understands, “Don’t you see, TARS? I brought myself here. We’re here to communicate with the three-dimensional world. We’re the bridge… ‘They’ have access to infinite time, infinite space… But no way to find what they need – but I can find Murph and find a way to tell her – like I found this moment”

Here we go, in case of dimensions, we knew about only three dimensions until the mid-1700s; the length (often labeled x), width (y), and depth (z) of an object and then the time was added as a necessary fourth dimension. Wondering why? Suppose, you want to meet someone, somewhere and at some point in time, so, what will you tell him? Let’s assume you want to meet him at 234 W 42nd St, NY 10036, but when? Again, you want him at 5:30, but where? This is why time was added as a dimension later along the three.

Though we can move freely in the three dimensions we’re literally a prisoner of the fourth dimension, time. And we cannot break its rule and move freely through it, which we call time travel and everything.

While the cube itself is free to the prison of time. Meaning that you, I, everyone is free to move in three dimensions but we’re still a slave of the fourth dimension, time. We cope with it while we’re on our own on the other three dimensions.

And the Tesseract is as TARS sad, “three-dimensional space inside their five-dimensional reality to allow you to understand it”. “They” have found a way to take the fourth dimension in control of the living; making time a physical dimension.

Facebook Comments

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *